The Tale of a Tiger

Finding inspiration can be as close as home or as far away as the other side of the world. (Video below.)

Before I turned to writing crime fiction novels, I wrote books and magazine articles on wildlife conservation, natural history, and adventure travel. This background has worked its way into my fiction (it’s no coincidence the main character in my Nick Drake Novels is a wildlife ranger). I’ve been fortunate to visit many lands, from the Amazon to Zanzibar, and to spend time with rare and exotic wildlife, including orangutans in Sumatra and great herds of migrating elephants and wildebeest on the Serengeti.

My itch to be in wild places among animals—it’s where I draw inspiration for my work—always needs scratching, and so, when my wife was invited to speak at the World Sustainable Development Summit in India earlier this month, I grabbed my laptop that held my current Nick Drake work-in-progress and buckled up for a 16-hour nonstop flight to Delhi.

When her conference concluded, we drove into Rajasthan, which translates to “Land of Kings.” The largest state by area in India, Rajasthan is in the northwest part of the country and shares a border with Pakistan. It is achingly beautiful with friendly people and a culture steeped in history. It is also home to four national parks and fifteen wildlife sanctuaries.

The first stop on our journey was Keoladeo National Park. Smack dab in the Central Asian Flyway (my Nick Drake readers know he works in a parallel flyway in southeastern Oregon), the park supports more than 360 species of resident birds and many migrants. Among our memorable sightings was an up-close view of one of the world’s highest flying birds, the bar-headed goose whose migration takes it over the Himalayas, and the world’s tallest flying bird (ostriches and emus don’t count), the five-foot tall sarus crane. Incredible.

We concluded our Indian wildlife journey at Ranthambhore National Park. This very special area was once home to palaces and maharajas. Now its king is the endangered Bengal tiger. It also supports leopard, striped hyena, jackal, sloth bear, monkey, and a variety of deer. The sanctuary is a phenomenal conservation success story. Fifteen years ago, only 26 tigers lived here. Through improved management techniques, education, and a crackdown on poaching, the population has reached 75 and is growing.

There was no guarantee we’d see a tiger in the rugged 150 square mile park, but to aid our chances, we befriended a local expert tracker and guide. Did we succeed? Did I find the inspiration I was looking for? See for yourself in the short video below.

Hello, Inspiration. Or, as they say in India, Namaste.

Click Here to Watch